Building Nova Scotia Part 2

Following on this morning’s post on the 3D printed version of the Dominion Atlantic Railway business car “Nova Scotia”, which was a post I’d started several weeks ago and somehow not finished, today, I wanted to bring things forward with a look at the car as things have advanced.  Firstly, the roof and car body have been painted and are getting close to being ready for decals.  The big holdup is needing the humidity to break, so that I can clearcoat after the decals are on to protect them.  I can’t spraypaint with my setup out on our balcony when its 30 degrees and crazy humid, thats a recipe for disaster!

IMGP2274RawConvTwo views of the partly painted Nova Scotia, the room side on the top, and the corridor side on the bottom.  The trucks and underframe hasn’t been painted, only primered.

Even without lettering, the car is really starting to look the part with the tuscan paint and the grey roof.  I’ve started to think about glazing for the windows.  Based on the photographs i have, any of the windows with a split pane had frosted glass above the split.  I will be able to replicate the look by sanding the back of clear styrene to basically rough it up.  I’ve never seen a clear picture to know if it was just frosted, or if there was a pattern to it.

The other area i talked about in the delayed post was the underbody.  It is now more or less as complete and detailed as its going to get.  While I have access to the car at the Toronto Railway museum, the way it is parked inside the stalls, and the way things are stored around and beneath it in the inspection pit, means I can’t actually get that close to the remaining underbody details.  From what is visible, and from pictures of the car in service, I have put together a good enough underbody.  Given the nature of 3D printing, if I get better information and really want to go to town, I can re-print the underframe and do another!

IMGP2282RawConvThree views of the underbody details of the HO Scale Model of Nova Scotia

As you can see, the biggest remaining task is to paint the underbody and trucks, which is on hold as noted above until we get some cooler and non-humid weather in the Toronto area!

The next big project is building a representative interior for the car.  I have very little information on how the interior was laid out before it got to Orillia and its time as part of the restaurant.  The current interior layout isn’t how it was laid out pre-Orillia.  I have some friends who were around in the Upper Canada Railway Society days looking to see if a newsletter was published when they owned the car with a floor plan diagram.  Failing that, I can guestimate something based on normal practice for other similar cars, based on the window locations so it isn’t completely see-through when finished.

The other major to-do is the railings for the observation platforms.  I have 3D printed versions, but they are super fine and fiddly, and frankly, fragile.  I haven’t tried to put any paint on them yet, and I have visions of my big hands breaking them once painted trying to get them into the holes on the end decks.  I am seriously considering re-drawing them and trying to see if i can get them etched in brass.  I think in the long run a brass etched part will both look better and be stronger for handling and use.

I don’t set timelines/completion dates on projects, as i find it leads to rushing and to mistakes, but this one has the feel of one that if the weather cools down a bit and i can paint, that i can have it done early in the fall.  The good thing is, as i’m working to no deadline other than liking the feeling of finishing a project, if i don’t, its not a big deal!

That said, as i type, i was just out on our balcony, its actually in the range of paintable weather, but i don’t see me pulling the gear out at 8pm on a Saturday night to setup the spray booth.  Maybe Sunday morning though if i wake up and its not raining like they are forecasting.  We shall see.

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