Form 7355 – Safety Rules – June 1, 1952

Sometimes when you go to a Train Show, the thing you spend the least on is the winner of the day.  I went to the Ancaster Train Show today with some friends, carpooling out from the City, then going for a relaxing pub lunch after before returning to the City.  With layout planning dominating my thoughts, I haven’t been getting much work done on building models, and, to be frank, the joy of the thought of building a layout has me focusing on finishing things that are on my workbench to clear it for layout building projects, rather than looking for more to start.  On the day, I didn’t spend very much at all.  I bought a single reference photo of a CPR Steam Locomotive, a detail part (singular, sad really), a sheet of decals, and a couple of pieces of vintage CN paper (A 1947 Eastern Canada Passenger Timetable, and a 1952 set of Safety Rules). (Edit: I also got a 0-6-0 Steam locomotive, but I didn’t pay for that, it was a generous gift from a fellow modller who reads the blog Rick De Candido as an opportunity for a future project, see the single photo I bought and some future post about it!)

The Safety Rules, are the clear winner of my day, for a whole dollar, I got a copy of a June 1952 Canadian National Form 7355, the Safety Rules for Train, Engine, Yard and other Transportation Employees.

IMGP4306RawConvA little yellow book with 36 pages of Safety Rules, in force as of June 1, 1952

These are a wholly entertaining read, looking at how Health and Safety matters were treated 65 years ago.  “Obedience to the rules is essential to safety”.  The rules read like a how to manual of how to blame the employee if something happens to them, in the guise of a set of rules to make sure they operate the railway safely.

IMGP4309RawConvThe Index and General Notice inside the front of Form 7355

Now, while these rules may not have a lot of applicability on a model railroad, one fun thing caught my eye when I got home and actually looked at it closely (because lets face it, for a $1, I bought without even thinking twice).  Form 7355 has a sign and tear our page in the front for record keeping.  Upon issuance of the rules, and employee had to acknowledge the requirement to know the rules and obey them.  The receipt was to be torn out and maintained by a supervisor or foreman.  This is the kind of paperwork you could easily re-produce and use as part of an operating session.  Each new operator has to sign on and acknowledge they will be bound by the railways safety rules.  At the end of the Op Session, it can be a little souvenier of their visit to your railroad and era.

IMGP4308RawConvReceipt Page of Form 7355.  Something you could require all your Ops Session crew to sign to ensure they are fully on board as railroad employees following your safety rules.

As is often the case, the show was much more fun just for seeing friends and chatting shop than it was in terms of buying anything.  As always it seems, there were lots of shiny things to try and draw you in to buy, but for today at least, cheapness won the trip for me!

 

One thought on “Form 7355 – Safety Rules – June 1, 1952

  1. Nice find. Prototype paperwork is always interesting. I’ve often found tidbits in documents like this that I can translate into an operating session on my own layout. Even if I don’t, I learn something about the real world of railways, which always helps.
    Cheers!

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